Current topics of the WOGE study

How are people in East Friesland? How is their health, how do they feel? What is the need for support? Are family centres needed in the region, and if so, how should these be structured? These are some issues investigated by the “WOGE” (German abbreviation for: Well-Being and Health with Families for Families) research project, which has now started at Emden/Leer University and is headed by Prof. Dr. Jutta Lindert.

Within the context of the research work, precise data will be collected and evaluated using reliable methods over the coming three years, which data will serve as a basis for preparing a cross-sectional study.

“As yet, no representative data on the well-being and mental health of the people living in the region is available. We are therefore crucially depending on the cooperation of the population”, said Prof. Dr. Lindert. On Monday (February 20), on the occasion of the start of the programme and for coordinating the next steps, there was a meeting held at the university with representatives of the Emden City Council (Department of Health and Social Affairs, Children & Family Special Service, Social Psychiatry Service), the Coordination Service for Migration and Participation as well as facilities of child and youth support (Lower Saxony Institute for Early Childhood Education and Development).

“We are eager to find out whether there is a need for family centres here. From other regions we know that family centres crucially contribute to the sustainable promotion of mental health and well-being of family members of all generations”, professor Lindert stressed the importance of collecting the data for the region.

The WOGE project is sponsored out of funds of the European Regional Development Fund.

 

 

Contact

Foto Frau Prof. Dr. Jutta Lindert

Prof. Dr. Jutta Lindert
Project Director

(04921) 807-1632
E-Mail

 

 

The WOGE project is sponsored by the European Regional Development Fund and by the Federal State of Lower Saxony.

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